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Welcome on this blog full of information about Newspaper Comic Strips, and offcourse the comics.

The first newspaper comic strips appeared in North America in the late 19th century. The Yellow Kid is usually credited as the first. However, the art form combining words and pictures developed gradually and there are many examples of proto-comic strips.

The Swiss teacher, author and caricature artist Rodolphe Töpffer (Geneva, 1799–1846) is considered the father of the modern comic strips. His illustrated stories such as Histoire de M. Vieux Bois (1827), first published in the USA in 1842 as The Adventures of Obadiah Oldbuck or Histoire de Monsieur Jabot (1831), inspired subsequent generations of German and American comic artists. In 1865, the German painter, author and caricaturist Wilhelm Busch created the strip Max and Moritz, about two trouble-making boys, which had a direct influence on the American comic strip. Max and Moritz was a series of severely moralistic tales in the vein of German children’s stories such as Struwwelpeter (“Shockheaded Peter”); in one, the boys, after perpetrating some mischief, are tossed into a sack of grain, run through a mill and consumed by a flock of geese. Max and Moritz provided an inspiration for German immigrant Rudolph Dirks, who created the Katzenjammer Kids in 1897. Familiar comic-strip iconography such as stars for pain, sawing logs for snoring, speech balloons, and thought balloons originated in Dirks’ strip.

Hugely popular, Katzenjammer Kids occasioned one of the first comic-strip copyright ownership suits in the history of the medium. When Dirks left William Randolph Hearst for the promise of a better salary under Joseph Pulitzer, it was an unusual move, since cartoonists regularly deserted Pulitzer for Hearst. In a highly unusual court decision, Hearst retained the rights to the name “Katzenjammer Kids”, while creator Dirks retained the rights to the characters. Hearst promptly hired Harold Knerr to draw his own version of the strip. Dirks renamed his version Hans and Fritz (later, The Captain and the Kids). Thus, two versions distributed by rival syndicates graced the comics pages for decades. Dirks’ version, eventually distributed by United Feature Syndicate, ran until 1979.

In America, the great popularity of comics sprang from the newspaper war (1887 onwards) between Pulitzer and Hearst. The Little Bears (1893–96) was the first American comic with recurring characters, while the first color comic supplement was published by the Chicago Inter-Ocean sometime in the latter half of 1892, followed by the New York Journal’s first color Sunday comic pages in 1897. On January 31, 1912, Hearst introduced the nation’s first full daily comic page in his New York Evening Journal. The history of this newspaper rivalry and the rapid appearance of comic strips in most major American newspapers is discussed by Ian Gordon. Numerous events in newspaper comic strips have reverberated throughout society at large, though few of these events occurred in recent years, owing mainly to the declining role of the newspaper comic strip as an entertainment form.

I only place newspaperstrips from before 2000, with the occasional exception.

You can access the information and comics through the sidebar.

The comics are mostly in packages from around 100mb, inside these rar-packages you will find the comics in cbr format.

You can view the comics with any cbr-reader like CDisplay or ComicRack.

I did not scan the comics myself only collect them from various sites on the internet, internet archive, Usenet Newsgroups and torrents.
So thanks to all the scanners and uploaders.
This blog is purely ment to preserve the comics and to enjoy them, no financial meanings are involved, if you like the comics buy them as long as they are availabe, because nothing can beat the feeling of reading a real comic.

If you find something wrong (downloads, numbering, information) please let me know so that i can correct the error.

 

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Thanks to the following sites for information :

Barnacle Press

Wikipedia

 

742 responses »

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  1. SÉRGIO MARTINS DE SOUZA says:

    I commented about the absence of Tarzan’s strips and comic books. I would also like to find Popeye’s newspaper strips (the fantastic Segar etc.). Cheers!

    Like

  2. jeff nelson says:

    Good day. This week I am uploading a run of another early, obscure but delightful offering:

    SCHOOL DAYS/OPHELIA AND HER SLATE 1909-1913

    Clare Dwiggins (1974-1958) (who usually signed his work “Dwig”) had a lengthy career in magazine and newspaper cartooning, stretching from the 1890s up to the time of his death. A lot of his work consists of sentimental reflections on the remembered wonders of childhood – most notable being a very long run of strips loosely adapted from Twain’s ‘Huckleberry Finn’. They’re all right in their way, but not the sort of thing which runs very much to my taste.

    He vaulted into the realm of the screwall with one short-lived but brilliant effort, the wild and frenetic ‘School Days’ – a big Sunday panel overfilled with the madcap doings of the class while the young and pretty teacher is distracted by the lecherous school board members leering at her through the window. All the while, cross-eyed Opehlia is standing in the corner, holding a slate with her commentary on the crazed hijinks. It’s all wild and wacky, filled with proto-Goldbergian inventions and the sort of things which Kurtzman and Elder would later dub Eyeball Kicks.

    The wacky goings-on were only to last a few months, before the panel evolved into a smaller daily panel focusing on Ophelia and her own crazy actions. And eventually this was to become a daily bit showing only Ophelia herself commenting on the world. This material rapidly becomes very saccharine, and not interesitng enough for me to post. [The Ophelia panels already on this blog consists of some of this material.] Later on, in the late 1920s, Dwig revived ‘School Days’ as a daily strip, but the screwball madness has long vanished. I also omit this material.

    Still, the brief and glorious original run of ‘School Days’ is well worth salvaging from the sands of a century past. [It’s a pity that only the at-times sketchy b&w microfilms are all that were available to me – many of the most wonderful details are nealry impossible to make out.]

    https://www.mediafire.com/folder/ievax226c60fs/School+Days+-+Ophelia+1909-1913

    [I want to give a special shout-out to Paul Tumey’s tremendous book ‘Screwball!’ which is the work which first introduced me to Dwig’s work. Those who have been paying close note to the series of strips which I have been posting here over the past several months will see that they are, by and large, strips which Tumey discusses. One might regard what I’ve been doing here as a supplement to his monuental study…]

    Liked by 1 person

  3. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 14-11-2021

    Ophelia and her Slate – Thanks to Jeff Nelson

    You can find it in More Strips

    Like

  4. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 14-11-2021

    Johnny Hazard Sundays S021,S023,S024,S027,S028,S029,S033
    All updates with English text and better quality and coloured

    Thanks to Ar and BruceBanner

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Herry Taiwan says:

    believe it or not By Ripley in THE OKLAHOMAN Digital Archives :https://digital.olivesoftware.com/olive/apa/oklahoman/default.aspx#panel=home

    strange as it seems by john hix in American Press Archive :https://digital.olivesoftware.com/olive/apa/ampress/default.aspx#panel=home

    Like

  6. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 15-11-2021

    Alley Oop Sawalla Chronicles
    Ace Comics 4x
    Dennis the Menace Sundays 1967-1972
    King Comics 6x
    Magic Comics 9x
    Nemo Classic Comics Library 32x – New Title
    Superman 3 daily stories
    Tip Top Comics 31x
    Tip Topper Comics 15x New Title

    Like

  7. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 15-11-2021

    Johnny Hazard Sundays S044,S045,S046,S047,S049
    All updates with English text and better quality and most are coloured

    Thanks to Ar and BruceBanner

    Like

  8. Herry Taiwan says:

    Did You Know? AND Scott’s Scrapbook BY R. J. Scott (1886-1968) in the Winona Newspaper Database : http://digital.olivesoftware.com/olive/apa/winona/#panel=home

    Like

  9. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 18-11-2021

    Johnny Hazard Sundays S050
    Now complete and better quality

    Thanks to Ar and BruceBanner

    Liked by 1 person

  10. jeff nelson says:

    Well, friends, all things must come to an end. I am reaching the bottom of the well of screwball and oddball comic strips which I have available to post. But I am looking to go out with a bang, with the largest available archive of one of the monumental classics of the comic strip form:

    HAPPY HOOLIGAN 1900-1932

    F.B. Opper (1857-1937) was already an established comic artist whose work had been appearing in the humor magazines for more than 20 years when he was hired by Hearst in 1900. And he brought all of his comedic genius to bear with his creation of Happy Hooligan – the kind-hearted, always friendly and irrepressible hobo who can’t seem to keep out of trouble. This Sunday strip was an instant hit, and Happy very quickly came to rival the Yellow Kid and the Katzenjammer Kids in popularity. Happy is also notable as being one of, if not the very, first comic strip character to become a major marketing sensation – within a year or so there were Happy Hooligan dolls, games, toys, books. He was later to become the star of some of the very earliest Hollywood silent movies, both in live action and animated format.

    Happy Hooligan can also be seen as notable in that Opper seems to have invented a lot of the commonplace tropes of the comic strip and comic book form. He is the first to use the ‘wise-cracking newphews’ idea, as Happy quickly picks up three such relatives, a good 30+ years before Huey, Dewey and Louie. Opper also seems to be the very first artist to utilize what we would now call cross-overs, as he frequently has guest appearances from his other comic strip characters Alphonse and Gaston, and Maud the Mule. [There are even a few occsions when Happy crosses over with Rudolph Dirks’ Katzenjammer Kids.]

    On a less positive note, Opper also is one of the first comic strip artists to send his characters on world-spanning advantures, and thus is one of the first to utilize offensive racist stereotypes – and there are a lot of them. There are not only numerous racist Black images, but also offensive Chinese,offensive Inuits, and various offensive European stereotypes of every imaginable variety. Opper can be regarded as an equal opportunity racist.

    One final thing of note, is that Opper seems to have regularly tired of his Hooligan. There are any number of periods when he drops the character altogether to do other strips. But time and again, we see him start up another strip, only to have Happy and his relatives start showing up in subsidiary roles, and eventually taking over the proceedings again… I don’t know if this was a matter of Opper becoming reinspired, or getting pressured by his editors to reintroduce his most popular and profitable franchise…

    At any rate, by the mid 1920s Opper had finished such peregrinations, and at last settled down to focus on the Hooligan, and continued with strip until his failing eyesight forced him into retirement in 1932.

    This is a big archive I am presenting, and I am having to split it up into two parts. Here is the first half:

    https://www.mediafire.com/folder/rw5thbxgc1193/Happy+Hooligan+1900-1916

    The second half will follow, probably not until tomorrow.

    Like

    • boutje777 says:

      Thank you very much, i will wait for the second part before i make a new page for these, take your time.

      Like

    • I got the sense, from my research into Opper, that he never tired of Happy and came to sort of live in his world. He came from a time when newspaper cartoonists mixed it up quite a bit and were in the habit of creating new strips on a regular basis, and I think he kept that up throughout his career, even though his publisher wanted him to land on continuuing series like Mr. Dough and Mr. Dubb. Basically, once Opper created a new character he liked, he used them … no matter what the strip was titled. It was common in the early decades of American newspaper comics to cross characters over and Opper did that a lot. You can see several “old school” cartoonists working this way throughout their careers approaching the mid-20th Century, such as Rube Goldberg (who idolized Opper) and Herriman, who often brought characters from much older strips into Krazy Kat.

      On another note: Does anyone have, or know of a source, for Happy Hooligan dailies from the 1920s? If so, please reply here or contact me!

      Like

  11. jeff nelson says:

    As promised, here is the 2nd half ot the Happy Hooligan megapost:

    https://www.mediafire.com/folder/ds1yvm4mvsc2o/Happy+Hooligan+1917-1932

    And, as I said yesterday, this draws to an end the comic strips I currently have available for posting here. But fret not, as I continue to trawl my way through the online archives seeking out other strips. I hope to be back, with another passel of wonderful old comic strips available to share in a few months… Take care, everybody, and see you all in the funny pages…

    Like

    • boutje777 says:

      Thank you very much i will make a new page for this later today. Thanks also for all your contributions to the blog and take care.

      Like

  12. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 22-11-2021

    Johnny Hazard 8 Sundays S063-S070

    Thanks to:

    Ar
    ComixFiend
    Ranjan Gangopadhyay
    Udai Singh

    Liked by 1 person

  13. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 22-11-2021

    Happy Hooligan 1900-1932

    Thanks to Jeff Nelson

    You can find them at the picturelinks.

    Like

  14. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 26-11-2021

    Johnny Hazard 10 Sundays S071-S080

    Thanks to:

    Ar
    ComixFiend
    Ranjan Gangopadhyay
    Udai Singh

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Jagdeep says:

    i was looking for mandrake comic strip story in which Theron visited NYC. I have seen a couple of strips of it in google but could not find the complete story. Thanks.

    Like

    • Ar says:

      @Jagdeep

      Good morning.

      To try to help you try to understand if:
      Is it a daily or weekly story.

      In the strips you saw can you see out any date? (month-day)

      Like

      • Jagdeep says:

        There is no date mentioned on the pic on Google. I can share the pic with you if you can give me your email I’d.

        Like

  16. Ar says:

    amrodi9999@gmail.com
    Sent the pictures and the site where you find them

    Like

  17. Ar says:

    Good afternoon

    The story you refer to is entitled:

    Mandrake’s Wedding at Cockaigne (27 Jan 1997 to 2 Aug 1997)

    It is the story D225

    You can download it from the site, in black and white.

    Later it was released by CK between 6/10/2014 to 11/04/2015

    That one doesn’t exist on the site because the time limit for posting is 2000.

    Cheers

    Like

  18. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 04-12-2021

    Johnny Hazard 10 Sundays S081-S090

    Thanks to:

    Ar
    ComixFiend
    Ranjan Gangopadhyay
    Udai Singh

    Liked by 2 people

  19. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 11-12-2021

    Johnny Hazard 10 Sundays S091-S100

    Thanks to:

    Ar
    ComixFiend
    Ranjan Gangopadhyay
    Udai Singh

    Liked by 2 people

  20. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 18-12-2021

    Johnny Hazard 15 Sundays S101-S115

    Thanks to:

    Ar
    ComixFiend
    Ranjan Gangopadhyay
    Udai Singh

    Liked by 2 people

  21. Ar says:

    For all, whatever your religion is

    my sincere wishes for a

    Merry Christmas

    and a

    Happy New Year

    Ar

    Liked by 1 person

  22. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 30-12-2021

    Buz Sawyer D047 Operation Skipoff (better quality)
    Buz Sawyer D048 The Matchmaker (better quality)
    Thanks to Ar

    Liked by 1 person

  23. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 31-12-2021

    Buck Rogers 4 Sunday stories 47-50

    Thanks to Ar

    Liked by 1 person

  24. drsunilk says:

    Hi, awesome posts Sir. Tried downloading Mandrake from https://www.boutjefedankt.nl but none of the links are not working. Can you please share the link again. And thanks a ton!

    Like

  25. boutje777 says:

    I’ve reorganized the Johnny Hazard page.

    Like

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