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Welcome on this blog full of information about Newspaper Comic Strips, and offcourse the comics.

The first newspaper comic strips appeared in North America in the late 19th century. The Yellow Kid is usually credited as the first. However, the art form combining words and pictures developed gradually and there are many examples of proto-comic strips.

The Swiss teacher, author and caricature artist Rodolphe Töpffer (Geneva, 1799–1846) is considered the father of the modern comic strips. His illustrated stories such as Histoire de M. Vieux Bois (1827), first published in the USA in 1842 as The Adventures of Obadiah Oldbuck or Histoire de Monsieur Jabot (1831), inspired subsequent generations of German and American comic artists. In 1865, the German painter, author and caricaturist Wilhelm Busch created the strip Max and Moritz, about two trouble-making boys, which had a direct influence on the American comic strip. Max and Moritz was a series of severely moralistic tales in the vein of German children’s stories such as Struwwelpeter (“Shockheaded Peter”); in one, the boys, after perpetrating some mischief, are tossed into a sack of grain, run through a mill and consumed by a flock of geese. Max and Moritz provided an inspiration for German immigrant Rudolph Dirks, who created the Katzenjammer Kids in 1897. Familiar comic-strip iconography such as stars for pain, sawing logs for snoring, speech balloons, and thought balloons originated in Dirks’ strip.

Hugely popular, Katzenjammer Kids occasioned one of the first comic-strip copyright ownership suits in the history of the medium. When Dirks left William Randolph Hearst for the promise of a better salary under Joseph Pulitzer, it was an unusual move, since cartoonists regularly deserted Pulitzer for Hearst. In a highly unusual court decision, Hearst retained the rights to the name “Katzenjammer Kids”, while creator Dirks retained the rights to the characters. Hearst promptly hired Harold Knerr to draw his own version of the strip. Dirks renamed his version Hans and Fritz (later, The Captain and the Kids). Thus, two versions distributed by rival syndicates graced the comics pages for decades. Dirks’ version, eventually distributed by United Feature Syndicate, ran until 1979.

In America, the great popularity of comics sprang from the newspaper war (1887 onwards) between Pulitzer and Hearst. The Little Bears (1893–96) was the first American comic with recurring characters, while the first color comic supplement was published by the Chicago Inter-Ocean sometime in the latter half of 1892, followed by the New York Journal’s first color Sunday comic pages in 1897. On January 31, 1912, Hearst introduced the nation’s first full daily comic page in his New York Evening Journal. The history of this newspaper rivalry and the rapid appearance of comic strips in most major American newspapers is discussed by Ian Gordon. Numerous events in newspaper comic strips have reverberated throughout society at large, though few of these events occurred in recent years, owing mainly to the declining role of the newspaper comic strip as an entertainment form.

I only place newspaperstrips from before 2000, with the occasional exception.

You can access the information and comics through the sidebar.

The comics are mostly in packages from around 100mb, inside these rar-packages you will find the comics in cbr format.

You can view the comics with any cbr-reader like CDisplay or ComicRack.

I did not scan the comics myself only collect them from various sites on the internet, internet archive, Usenet Newsgroups and torrents.
So thanks to all the scanners and uploaders.
This blog is purely ment to preserve the comics and to enjoy them, no financial meanings are involved, if you like the comics buy them as long as they are availabe, because nothing can beat the feeling of reading a real comic.

If you find something wrong (downloads, numbering, information) please let me know so that i can correct the error.

 

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Thanks to the following sites for information :

Barnacle Press

Wikipedia

 

647 responses »

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  1. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 25-08-2021

    Jeff Hawke 6 Daily Stories D082-D087 (in Italian)

    All thanks to:

    Ar
    ComixFiend
    Ranjan Gangopadhyay
    Udai Singh

    Like

  2. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 26-08-2021

    Buz Sawyer D046 Submarine Jinx (better quality)
    Thanks to Ar

    Like

  3. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 27-08-2021

    Jeff Hawke 2 Daily Stories D101-D102 (in Italian)

    All thanks to:

    Ar
    ComixFiend
    Ranjan Gangopadhyay
    Udai Singh

    Like

  4. jeff nelson says:

    Another biggie post for this weekend, an unjustly neglected masterpiece from Charles Rodrigues:

    CHARLIE 1980-1989 70 % complete

    Charles Rodrigues was one of the most prolific magazine gag cartoonists of the 2nd half of the 20th century, and one with perhaps the widest range of distribution. He sold cartoons to almost every market you can imagine, from Cracked to Playboy, from Esquire to the liberal Catholic magazine The Critic, from Saturday Evening Post to National Lampoon; and nearly everything he ever did is excellent. He is best known for his work for the Lampoon, for which he was encouraged to draw the most provocative and outrageously offensive material imaginable – these are perhaps the most transgressive cartoons you will ever see this side of S. Clay Wilson…

    Seeing the extreme nature of much of his work, it is more than a bit surprising to me that he also did several daily newspaper strips. The best and longest running of these was Charlie, which debuted in 1980. It’s a gag panel along the lines of ‘Sad Sack’ or ‘The Born Loser’ with a nebbishy title character who bore no small resemblance to Rodrigues himself. But we’re far, far from Ziggy territory here – there is a deep darkness and seething cynicism to be found here, which is unlike almost anything else I’ve ever seen on the newspaper comic page. Not very many papers ever dared to carry it, and it amazes me that any editor had the cojones to pick it up, as at this time the comics page was wholly devoted to the tame, the comfortable and the repetitive – this was several years before Breathed, Larson and Watterson were to bring about a creative revival for the daily strips.

    As I remarked, not very many papers carried ;’Charlie’, and over the first couple of years of its run I’ve only been able to find partial and incomplete runs. Then it disappears entirely from the newspapers by 1989. But Rodrigues appears to have carried it forward for some years thereafter, as I have found a single, solitary example from an online issue of ‘Funny Times” from 1996.

    https://www.mediafire.com/folder/kyz90lwokurw1/1980+Charlie+C.+Rodrigues

    Like

  5. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 29-08-2021

    Charlie 1980-1989
    New title, you can find it in the section More Strips
    Thanks to Jeff Nelson

    Like

  6. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 30-08-2021

    James Bond D024-D028 – Thanks to Ar

    Like

  7. jeff nelson says:

    Good day to all. This week I’m looking to post a long run of something I find endlessly charming and delightful:

    STANGE WORLD OF MR MUM 1958-1971 98% complete

    Whimsical and off-kilter, Irving Phillips’ silent observer of the wonderful and bizarre things hidden in plain sight in this marvelous world, if we ever would take the time to really look, was a breath of fresh air on the newspaper comic pages during its run. Almost every one of them makes me smile…

    My complaint regarding this panel is the very shoddy way in which it was treated. Newspaper editors have never hesitated to cut, stretch or re-format comic strips and panels however their fancy might strike them. But poor Mr. Mum suffered from such shabby treatment more than most. A high percentage of the papers which ran the panel (at least a high percentage of the ones available in the online archives) slashed off portions of the art to shoehorn it into a smaller column size. For a good number of the panels I have – perhaps as much as 10% – a cut version is the only one I could locate. [One sure way to determine this: any panel which is missing the ‘Strange World of Mr. Mum’ title in the top corner is one which has been mutilated…] I know that it’s profitless for me to grouse about this soft of thing 50 to 60 years after the fact, but it just burns me up.

    Well, enough of this soapbox tantrum. I am most pleased to here present the goods:

    https://www.mediafire.com/folder/nfgxi6jpe20wn/Strange+World+of+Mr+Mum+1958-1971

    Like

  8. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 05-09-2021

    Strange World of Mr. Mum 1958-1971
    Thanks to Jeff Nelson

    You can find them at the picturelinks.

    Like

  9. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 08-09-2021

    James Bond D029-D032 – Thanks to Ar

    Like

    • Jose says:

      Hello Boutje,
      Greetings from Bangalore,India.
      I was a great fan of paico classics, a series of comics with great art work when it was published in the eighties. It was stopped in the nineties but had great fan following.

      A lot of people would still love to read them and store them. Can you please find and upload them?
      Please please find them.

      Like

  10. jeff nelson says:

    This week I offer up an unjustly obscure, largely forgotten little gem:

    SIR BAGBY 1959-1966 98% complete

    No, this isn’t going to land on anybody’s list of greatest comic strips of all times, but Sir Bagby, created by the brothers Rick and Bill Hackney, was not lacking in considerable charm. Featuring Rick’s clean, contemporary art and Bill’s sharp writing, the strip featured some nice, if light satirical content, and frequently broke the fourth wall to enjoyable effect. A good touchstone for comparison might be the ‘Fractured Fairytales’, which were appearing at much the same time. It’s well worth checking out:

    https://www.mediafire.com/folder/lkmtrvnohkcup/Sir+Bagby+1959-1966

    Like

  11. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 10-09-2021

    James Bond D034-D037 – Thanks to Ar

    Like

  12. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 10-09-2021

    Sir Bagby 1959-1966
    Thanks to Jeff Nelson

    You can find them in More Strips.

    Like

  13. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 12-09-2021

    James Bond D025, D032 Both Upgraded
    Thanks to Ar

    Like

  14. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 13-09-2021

    James Bond D040-D046 – Thanks to Ar

    Like

  15. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 13-09-2021

    James Bond D002,D012,D017,D018 Upgraded with colourstrips
    Thanks to Ar and Ranjan

    Like

  16. Jose says:

    Will you remember to watch out for paico classics?
    They were reprints of Pendulum Illustrated Classics.
    Pendulum is still printing them I guess.
    Please try to find them, Boutje

    Like

  17. jeff nelson says:

    This week I’m taking us way, way back, to present the formative work of one of the seminal American comic creators:

    GENE AHERN EARLY WORKS 1915-1921

    Ahern first emerged on the scene in 1915 with a strip usually (but not always) entitled ‘Squirrel Food.’ Franky, in his first months Ahern is doing a blatant imitation of Rube Goldberg – even going so far as producing his onw imitations of Goldberg Machines a handful of times. But he gradually starts to find his own voice, particularly after he launches his character Balmy Benny.

    When ‘Squirrel Food’ and Benny reach their end, there is a gap for several months, but then Ahern reappears with the much stronger offering ‘Otto Auto’. I have read that this strip was a great success for a while, with a national campaign urging readers to send in ideas of how to stop Otto in his madcap racing through the countryside. But Otto was only to be a brief step in Ahern’s rapid development – as will be seen in the next part of my posting series. Tune in next week, friends…

    https://www.mediafire.com/folder/u9pzyc5bqg6p0/early+Gene+Ahern+1915-1921

    Like

    • boutje777 says:

      Thank you very much, i will update these later today. I think i’m gonna make 3 new pages, 1 for Squirrel Food, 1 for Ottto Auto and 1 for Balmy Benny.

      Like

  18. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 18-09-2021

    Balm Benny 1918-1919 Gene Ahern
    Otto Auto 1919-1921 Gene Ahern
    Squirrel Food 1915-1919 Gene Ahern
    All 3 thanks to Jeff Nelson

    You can find them in More Strips

    Like

  19. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 20-09-2021

    Johnny Hazard 5 Sundays S016-S020

    Thanks to:

    Ar
    ComixFiend
    Ranjan Gangopadhyay
    Udai Singh

    Like

  20. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 20-09-2021

    I’ve re reorganized the James Bond page.
    All stories are now complete and most are better quality. D001-D052.
    There is also a coloured section with stories that are partially coloured but also complete coloured stories. It might be worthwhile to download everything again.

    Thanks to Ar for making the stories and thanks to Shea Tennant for providing the missing en better quality strips.

    Like

  21. RAMESH BAGWANI says:

    Some paico classicshttps://www.mediafire.com/file/932fv7de3bcvvxw/prisner_of_zenda.rar/file

    Like

  22. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 21-09-2021

    Steve Canyon
    Collected newspaper strips 1947,1948 – Chapter 9 Puppy Love

    Thanks to Ar

    Like

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