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Alley Oop is a syndicated comic strip, created in 1932 by American cartoonist V. T. Hamlin, who wrote and drew the popular and influential strip through four decades for Newspaper Enterprise Association. Hamlin introduced an engaging cast of characters, and his story lines entertained with a combination of adventure, fantasy and humor.

Alley Oop, the strip’s title character, was a sturdy citizen in the prehistoric kingdom of Moo. He rode his pet dinosaur, Dinny, carried a stone war hammer and wore nothing but a fur loincloth. He would rather fight dinosaurs in the jungle than deal with his fellow countrymen in Moo’s capital and sole cave-town. Despite these exotic settings, the stories were often satires of American suburban life.  alley04

The first stories took place in the Stone Age and centered on Alley Oop’s dealings with his fellow cavemen in the kingdom of Moo. Oop and his pals had occasional skirmishes with the rival kingdom of Lem, ruled by King Tunk. The names Moo and Lem are references to the fabled lost continents of Mu and Lemuria.

On April 5, 1939, Hamlin introduced a new plot device, which greatly expanded his choice of storylines: A time machine, invented by the 20th-century scientist Dr. Elbert Wonmug, who bore a rather suspicious resemblance to the Grand Wizer. The name Wonmug was a bilingual pun on Albert Einstein; “ein” is German for “one”, and a “stein” is a form of drinking mug. Oscar Boom, is derived from the words Nobel Prize, Oscar = Prize and Boom after Alfred Nobel (the inventor of dynamite).

Transported to the 20th century by an early test of the machine (in the Sunday strip of April 9, 1939), Oop was hardly upset by the incident and apparently did not find modern society to be any different from his own. He then became Dr. Wonmug’s man in the field, embarking on expeditions to various periods and places in history, such as Ancient Egypt, the England of Robin Hood and the American frontier. Oop met such historical or mythical figures as Cleopatra, King Arthur and Ulysses in his adventures. In addition to the time machine, other science fiction devices were introduced. Oop once drove an experimental electric-powered race car, and in the 1940s, he traveled to the Moon. During his adventures he was often accompanied by his girlfriend, Ooola, and by the sometimes-villainous, sometimes-heroic G. Oscar Boom (G.O. Boom), Dr. Wonmug’s rival and occasional partner. A new laboratory assistant, Ava, joined the cast in recent years.

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Alley Oop’s name derived from the “let’s go” phrase allez, hop!, used as a cue by French gymnasts and trapeze artists. Initially, Alley Oop was a daily strip which had a run from December 5, 1932 to April 26, 1933. Beginning August 7, 1933, the strip was distributed by NEA syndicate, and the early material was reworked for a larger readership. The strip added a full page Sunday strip, on September 9, 1934. It also appeared in half-page, tabloid and half tab formats, which were smaller and/or dropped panels. During World War II, the full page vanished, and newspapers were offered a third of a page version that dropped panels, so more strips could fit on a page.

When Hamlin retired in 1971, Dave Graue, his assistant took over. Graue had been assisting Hamlin since 1950 and had been creating the daily solo since 1966, although co-signed by Hamlin. The last daily signed by Hamlin appeared December 31, 1972, and his last signed Sunday was April 1, 1973. From his North Carolina studio, Graue wrote and drew the strip through the 1970s and 1980s until Jack Bender took over as illustrator in 1991. Graue continued to write the strip until his August 2001 retirement. Four months later, on December 10, 2001, the 75-year-old Graue was killed in Flat Rock, North Carolina when a dump truck hit his car. The current Alley Oop Sunday and daily strips are drawn by Jack Bender and written by his wife Carole Bender.

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At its peak, Alley Oop was carried by 800 newspapers. Today, it appears in more than 600 newspapers. The strip and albums were popular in Mexico (under the name Trucutú) and in Brazil (Brucutu). In 1995, Alley Oop was one of 20 strips showcased in the Comic Strip Classics series of commemorative United States postage stamps.

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UPDATE 25-11-2016

322 pages/strips Alley Oop 1970
315 pages/strips Alley Oop 1971

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316 pages/strips Alley Oop 1972
342 pages/strips Alley Oop 1973

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325 pages/strips Alley Oop 1974

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319 pages/strips Alley Oop 1975
316 pages/strips Alley Oop 1976

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348 pages/strips Alley Oop 1977

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312 pages/strips Alley Oop 1978

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318 pages/strips Alley Oop 1979

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314 pages/strips Alley Oop 1980
313 pages/strips Alley Oop 1981
340 pages/strips Alley Oop 1982
343 pages/strips Alley Oop 1983

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313 pages/strips Alley Oop 1984
340 pages/strips Alley Oop 1985
368 pages/strips Alley Oop 1986

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361 pages/strips Alley Oop 1987
365 pages/strips Alley Oop 1988

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365 pages/strips Alley Oop 1989
359 pages/strips Alley Oop 1990
313 pages/strips Alley Oop 1991

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314 pages/strips Alley Oop 1992
314 pages/strips Alley Oop 1993
313 pages/strips Alley Oop 1994

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312 pages/strips Alley Oop 1995
361 pages/strips Alley Oop 1996
365 pages/strips Alley Oop 1997
365 pages/strips Alley Oop 1998
365 pages/strips Alley Oop 1999

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120 strips 1932
126 strips 1933
141 strips 1934
177 strips 1935
109 strips 1936
321 strips 1937
320 strips 1938

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314 strips 1939
318 strips 1940
317 strips 1941
324 strips 1942
331 strips 1943
330 strips 1944

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365 strips 1945
347 strips 1946
329 strips 1947
332 strips 1948

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341 strips 1949
352 strips 1950
339 strips 1951
333 strips 1952

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314 strips 1953
370 strips 1954
315 strips 1955
343 strips 1956

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79 strips 1957
79 strips 1958
79 strips 1959
79 strips 1960
78 strips 1961
88 strips 1962
120 strips 1963
127 strips 1964
320 strips 1965

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359 strips 1966
314 strips 1967
355 strips 1968
366 strips 1969

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2 responses »

  1. HojO says:

    Hello friend, a fantastic work you have done! I was searching ‘Alley Oop’ strips everywhere but couldn’t find except few.And from your blog now I get what i thought won’t be possible to have!!thank again.
    By any chance,do you have ’80s Alley Oop?I was introduced with the ’80s dailies so those are my closest ones.Thanks again.

    Like

    • boutje777 says:

      Thanks, you are welcome. I have Alley Oop 1970-1999 in preparation, i will try to upload and place them somewhere next week.

      Like

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