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Buck Rogers is a fictional character who first appeared in a novella titled Armageddon 2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan published in the August 1928 issue of the pulp magazine Amazing Stories as Anthony Rogers. A sequel, The Airlords of Han, was published in the March 1929 issue.

Philip Nowlan and the syndicate John F. Dille Company, later known as the National Newspaper Syndicate, were contracted to adapt the story into a comic strip. After Nowlan and Dille enlisted editorial cartoonist Dick Calkins as the illustrator, Nowlan adapted the first episode from Armageddon 2419, A.D. and changed the hero’s name from Anthony Rogers to Buck Rogers. The strip made its first newspaper appearance on January 7, 1929. Later adaptations included a serial film, a television series (where his first name was changed from Anthony to William), and other formats.

The adventures of Buck Rogers in comic strips, movies, radio and television became an important part of American popular culture. This pop phenomenon paralleled the development of space technology in the 20th century and introduced Americans to outer space as a familiar environment for swashbuckling adventure.  buckrogers03

Buck Rogers has been credited with bringing into popular media the concept of space exploration, following in the footsteps of literary pioneers such as Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, and Edgar Rice Burroughs.

The story of Anthony Rogers in Amazing Stories caught the attention of John F. Dille, president of the National Newspaper Service syndicate, and he arranged for Nowlan to turn it into a strip for syndication. The character was given the nickname Buck, and some have suggested that Dille coined that name based on the 1920s cowboy actor, Buck Jones.

On January 7, 1929, the Buck Rogers in the 25th Century A.D. comic strip debuted. Coincidentally, this was also the date that the Tarzan comic strip began. The first three frames of the series set the scene for Buck’s “leap” 500 years into Earth’s future:
I was 20 years old when they stopped the world war and mustered me out of the air service. I got a job surveying the lower levels of an abandoned mine near Pittsburgh, in which the atmosphere had a peculiar pungent tang and the crumbling rock glowed strangely. I was examining it when suddenly the roof behind me caved in and…
Buck is rendered unconscious, and a strange gas preserves him in a suspended animation or coma state. He awakens and emerges from the mine in 2429 A.D., in the midst of another war.

buckrogers01After rescuing Wilma, he proves his identity by showing her his American Legion button. She then explains how the Mongol Reds emerged from the Gobi desert to conquer Asia and Europe and then attacked America starting with that “big idol holding a torch”. Using their disintegrator beams, they easily defeated the army and navy and wiped out Washington, D.C. in three hours. As the people fled the cities, the Mongols built new cities on the ruins of the major cities. The Mongols left the Americans to fend for themselves as their advanced technology prevented the need for slave labor. The scattered Americans formed loosely bound organizations or “orgs” to begin to fight back.

Wilma takes Buck back to the Alleghany org in what was once Philadelphia. The leaders don’t believe his story at first but after undergoing electro-hypnotic tests, they believe him and admit him into their group.

On March 30, 1930, a Sunday strip joined the Buck Rogers daily strip. There was, as yet, no established convention for the same character having different adventures in the Sunday strip and the daily strip (many newspapers carried one but not the other), so the Sunday strip at first followed the adventures of Buck’s young friend Buddy Deering, Wilma Deering’s younger brother, and Buddy’s girlfriend Alura, later joined by Black Barney. It was some time before Buck made his first appearance in a Sunday strip. Other prominent characters in the strip included Buck’s friend Dr. Huer, who punctuated his speech with the exclamation, “Heh!”; the villainous Killer Kane and his paramour Ardala; and Black Barney, who began as a space pirate but later became Buck’s friend and ally. In addition, Buck and his friends encountered various alien races. Hostile species Buck met included the Tiger Men of Mars, the dwarf-like Asterites of the Asteroid belt, and giant robots called Mekkanos.

Like many popular comic strips of the day, Buck Rogers was reprinted in Big Little Books; illustrated text adaptations of the daily strip stories; and in a Buck Rogers pop-up book.

Nowlan is credited with the idea of serializing Buck Rogers, based on his novel Armageddon 2419 and its Amazing Stories sequels. Nowlan approached John Dille, who saw the opportunity to serialize the stories as a newspaper comic strip. Dick Calkins, an advertising artist, drew the earliest daily strips, and Russell Keaton drew the earliest Sunday strips. The author of Buck Rogers told the inventor R. Buckminster Fuller in 1930 that “he frequently used [Fuller’s] concepts for his cartoons”.

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Keaton wanted to switch to drawing another strip written by Calkins, Skyroads, so the syndicate advertised for an assistant and hired Rick Yager in 1932. Yager had formal art training at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts and was a talented watercolor artist; all the strips were done in ink and watercolor. Yager also had connections with the Chicago newspaper industry, since his father, Charles Montross Yager, was the publisher of The Modern Miller; Rick Yager was at one time employed to write the “Auntie’s Advice” column for his father’s newspaper. Yager quickly moved from inker and writer of the Buck Rogers “sub-strip” (early Sunday strips had a small sub-strip running below) to writer and artist of the Sunday strip and eventually the daily strips.

Authorship of early strips is extremely difficult to ascertain. The signatures at the bottoms of the strips are not accurate indicators of authorship; Calkins’ signature appears long after his involvement ended, and few of the other artists signed the artwork, while many pages are unsigned. Yager probably had complete control of Buck Rogers Sunday strips from about 1940 on, with Len Dworkins joining later as assistant. Dick Locher was also an assistant in the 1950s. For all of its reference to modern technology, the strip itself was produced in an old-fashioned manner—all strips began as India ink drawings on Strathmore paper, and a smaller duplicate (sometimes redrawn by hand) was hand-colored with watercolors. Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, has an extensive collection of original artwork. The strip’s artists also worked on a variety of tie-in promotions such as comic books, toys and model rockets.

Buck Rogers was popular enough to inspire other newspaper syndicates to launch their own science fiction strips. The most famous of these imitators was Flash Gordon (1934-2003); others included Jack Swift (1930-1937), Brick Bradford (1933-1987), Don Dixon and the Hidden Empire (1935-1941), Speed Spaulding (1940-1941), and John Carter of Mars (1941-1943).

The relations between the artists of the strip (Yager et al.) and the owners of the strip (the Syndicate) became acrimonious, and in mid-1958, the artists quit. Murphy Anderson was a temporary replacement, but he did not stay long. George Tuska began drawing the strip in 1959 and remained until the final installment of the original comic strip, which was published on 8 July 1967.

Revived in 1979 by Gray Morrow and Jim Lawrence, the strip was retitled Buck Rogers in the 25th Century in 1980. Long-time comic book writer Cary Bates signed on in 1981, continuing until the strip’s 1983 finale.

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UPDATE 26-11-2016

298 pages/strips Buck Rogers Daily Story 12 Beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet
052 pages/strips Buck Rogers Daily Story 14 With Woofs On The Jovian Plane
074 pages/strips Buck Rogers Daily Story 20 Planetoid Plot
025 pages/strips Buck Rogers Daily Story 24 Mummies Of Ceres

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11 Daily stories

01 Meeting the Mongols
02 Capturing the Mongol Emperor
03 Pact of Perpetual Peace
04 Defeat of the Mongol Rebels
05 Tiger Men of Mars
06 Land of the Golden People
07 Synthetic Gold Plot
08 City Beneath the Sea
09 Mystery of the Atlantian Gold Ships
10 On the Planetoid Eros
11 On the Moons of Saturn

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5 Daily stories

13 Asterite Invaders
15 In the City of Floating Globes
16 Depth Men of Jupiter
17 Tika of the Tidegates
18 Doom Comet

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3 Daily stories

19 Cognocrat Hypnosis
21 Rescue of King Innaldo
22 Prisoners on Uranus

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3 Daily stories

23 Liquid Light
46 Wanted For Murder
47 Dr. Modar of Saturn

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1 Daily story

48 Planet of Thor

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1 Daily story

49 Vulcan Trouble-Shooter

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5 Daily stories

50 Capsule-Men
67 Eternal Youth
68 Hydro-X Bomb Threat
69 Trouble at the Great Moon Fair
70 Threat to the Space Mirror

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Complete newspaper dailies v1 1929-1930

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7 Sunday stories

1-7

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6 Sunday stories

8-13

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4 Sunday stories

14-17

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4 Sunday stories

18-21

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3 Sunday stories

22-24

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3 Sunday stories

25,26 a,b

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4 Sunday stories

26 c,d,36,37

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6 Sunday stories

38-43

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4 Sunday stories

44,56-58

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3 Sunday stories

59-61

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3 Sunday stories

62-64

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5 Sunday stories

65-69

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6 Sunday stories

70-75

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6 Sunday stories

76-81

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4 Sunday stories

27,28 a,b,c

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3 Sunday stories

28 d,34,35

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6 responses »

  1. gbud says:

    Thank you for your files. Two files I found faulty: Buck Rogers Dailies 47 Dr Modar of Saturn & Dailies 49 Vulcan Trouble Shooter Part I Founding of Port Buck Rogers

    Like

  2. Craig Gunsul, professor of physics emeritus, Whitman College says:

    I remember a story from around 1950 where Buck ends up in the head of a robot quarterback. The game of football was played entirely by man-operated robots – the end with extensible arms; the Bronco Nagurski type, etc. Could you tell me where to locate this strip from my childhood?

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    • boutje777 says:

      I am afraid not, i hope someone else can. You can also try to find it on the Grand Comics Database where you can do an advance search for stories also and this way maybe you will have the storytitle, what make searching alot easier.

      Like

    • Curtis J. Hepworth says:

      Craig, I can help you with the Invasion of the Green Ray Smackers story line…feel free to contact me:

      Curtis J. Hepworth
      (ninety9zero@gmail.com)

      Like

      • Craig Gunsul, professor of physics emeritus, Whitman College says:

        Green Bay Smackers – I hadn’t remembered this, a good one. Is it possible to see the originals?

        Like

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