Paul Temple

Paul Temple is a fictional character, created by English writer Francis Durbridge (1912–1998). Temple is a professional author of crime fiction and an amateur private detective. Together with his journalist wife Louise, affectionately known as Steve after her pen name “Steve Trent”, he solves whodunnit crimes through subtle, humorously articulated deduction. Always the gentleman, the strongest oath he ever utters is “by Timothy”.

Created for the BBC radio serial Send for Paul Temple in 1938, the Temples have featured in over 30 BBC radio dramas, twelve serials for German radio, four British feature films, a dozen novels, and a BBC television series. A Paul Temple comic strip ran in the London Evening News from the mid-1950s to the early 1960s.

Paul Temple was a professional novelist. While he possessed no formal training as a detective, his background in constructing crime plots for his novels enabled him to apply deductive reasoning to solve cases whose solution had eluded Scotland Yard.

Over the course of each case, Temple eschewed formal interviews or other police techniques, in favour of casual conversations with suspects and witnesses. Yet even this informal style of investigation invariably precipitated attempts by the suspects to hamper him, through traps, ambushes, even assassination attempts. Surviving these, Temple would arrange a cocktail party or similar social event at which he unmasked the perpetrator.

At the end of each tale, Paul, Steve and Sir Graham Forbes held a post mortem. Here, Paul explained why certain events in the serial took place, which of these had been red herrings, and which had been genuine clues. Some elements of the plot had already been explained during the serial, while others were occasionally never fully explained, due to limitations of time.

The Paul Temple characters and formula were developed in a succession of BBC radio serials broadcast between 1938 and 1968, with several voice actors portraying the Temples. The longest running team, and the most popular with audiences, was Peter Coke (pronounced Cooke) and Marjorie Westbury, who starred together in every serial made between 1954 and 1968 — and Marjorie Westbury also co-starred as Steve Temple in every serial aired between 1945 and 1954.

The introductory and closing music for the majority of the long-running BBC radio series was Coronation Scot, composed by Vivian Ellis, although the earliest serials (those aired prior to December 1947) used an excerpt from Scheherazade by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.

The very earliest serials aired only on regional services of the BBC, in the Midlands. As the serials gained in popularity, they were aired nationally instead on the Home Service. But in 1945 they found a permanent home on the newly founded BBC Light Programme, where they remained (apart from occasional repeats on Home Service) until the final serial in 1968. Repeats of selected serials continued to be heard on Radio 4 (the new name for the Home Service) during the 1980s and as late as 1992 (when The Spencer Affair was repeated to celebrate Francis Durbridge’s 80th birthday).

Many of the early serials, in which the eponymous hero was played by a wide variety of different actors, have not survived the passage of time (although some still exist). However, almost all of those starring Peter Coke still exist; and these have been periodically repeated, from 2003 onwards, by digital radio station BBC Radio 7 (now called BBC Radio 4 Extra). In 2006 the station tracked down the then 93-year-old Coke for a half-hour interview programme, Peter Coke and the Paul Temple Affair.

Because no recordings survive for many of the early serials, in 2006 BBC Radio 4 began recreating them, in as authentic a manner as possible: as mono productions, employing vintage microphones and sound effects, and using the original scripts. In all cases Crawford Logan starred as Paul Temple with Gerda Stevenson as Steve, in place of the original leads. The first of these broadcasts, in August 2006, was a new 8-part production of Paul Temple and the Sullivan Mystery, originally aired in 1947. A new production of The Madison Mystery, from 1949, aired between May and July 2008, followed by the 1947 serial Paul Temple and Steve in June and July 2010. A Case for Paul Temple, from 1946, was transmitted in August and September 2011. The final such production to date was Paul Temple and the Gregory Affair, aired in 2013 (the longest of all the serials, running to ten episodes). Many of these new productions featured Welsh character actor Gareth Thomas as the head of Scotland Yard. Each of the new recordings was also released on CD.

Paul Temple’s catchphrase, “by Timothy”, first occurred in episode two of the first ever serial, Send for Paul Temple. As spoken by Kim Peacock in the 1940s serials, it made Temple sound like Wilfrid Hyde-White (it was a phrase Hyde-White frequently used, particularly in the BBC radio series The Men from the Ministry). Interviewed in 2006, Peter Coke said he hated the phrase, because even in the 1950s he thought it sounded old-fashioned.

In 1998, on the death of author Francis Durbridge, the BBC made a radio documentary about Paul Temple written by noted authority Professor Jeffrey Richards, entitled Send For Paul Temple (aired on 20 May 1998), which included extracts from surviving recordings held in the BBC sound archives going right back to the first ever serial in 1938.

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UPDATE 22-04-2018

1 story – Gromgate Killer

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9 stories

Affair of the Tired Tiger
Au Pair Affair
Death sitting down
Great Jewel Robbery
In order to view
Light Fingers
Project Deep Plunge
Runaway Knight
The Khanwada Conspiracy

Thanks to Paw Broon

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Romeo Brown

 

Romeo Brown was a likeable but somewhat bumbling private detective who far preferred socialising with his lady friends (like Miss Peach of Fingles Theatrical Agency and Fan, owner of the Matchwell Marriage Bureau) to working.

Originally created by Alfred Mazure, from 1957 Jim Holdaway took over the art, with Peter O’Donnell writing. When Romeo’s adventures ceased in 1962, O’Donnell and Holdaway created Modesty Blaise.

5 stories

The Admirals Grand-daughter
Romeo the Ruthless
The Arabian Knight
The Frolics of Fifi
The Girl and the Ghoul

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Fosdyke Saga

 

 

The Fosdyke Saga was a British comic strip by cartoonist Bill Tidy, published in the Daily Mirror newspaper from March 1971 – February 1985. Described as “a classic tale of struggle, power, personalities and tripe”, the strip was a parody of John Galsworthy’s classic novel series The Forsyte Saga. However, the slightly bizarre and strange antics of the characters and those around them had a Lancashire/Cheshire lean with mangles, chimneys and soot ever present.

The Fosdyke Saga was the story of Roger Ditchley, a wastrel son of tripe magnate, Old Ben Ditchley, who was deliberately disinherited by his father in favour of Jos Fosdyke. Roger, blinded by rage, seeks to regain his rightful inheritance over the next twelve years. His wicked plans are always thwarted as he enlists the most inept allies and twisted methods to attain his goal.

Each book included bizarre settings such as the rugby game between a Welsh choir and a lady’s casual rugby team held in a Salford hotel (the stairs collapsed in the first half), the hunt for the Tripe Naughtee and the unforgettable “Brain of Salford” competition.

The series was axed from the Daily Mirror in 1985, the year after tycoon Robert Maxwell had purchased Mirror Group Newspapers.

Created by well-known cartoonist Bill Tidy, who also produced cartoons for the satirical magazine Private Eye and created The Cloggies, the wry humour in this classic 1970s comic strip was very popular, if often unintelligible to those outside of the mid-north-west of England.

Adaptations

The Fosdyke Saga has been adapted as a TV movie, a radio serial by the BBC and a stage play.

The radio adaptation starred (among others) Miriam Margolyes, Enn Reitel, Christian Rodska and David Threlfall.

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1977

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Beau Peep

 

One of the most refreshingly funny comic strips of modern times, Beau Peep was the creation of writer Roger Kettle and artist Andrew Christine. Beau, a distinctly comical figure (real name Bert), joined the Foreign Legion to escape his brutish wife, Doris, but proved to be an incompetent soldier and a liability to his colleagues. The strip became instantly popular amongst the Star’s readers and 20 softback Beau Peep anthologies collecting the strips were published between 1980 and 1998.

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Axa

 

Axa was born in 2080, supposedly 100 years after a nuclear holocaust known as The Great contamination, in the City of Domes, where emotional attachments were forbidden. A wild spirit, she fled the city (and her lover, Jon) for a new life as a traveler and adventurer in the devastated world outside, exploring the ruins left behind by the ‘Old People’ and the often bizarre cliques of survivors which had sprung up. The first such group she encountered were the Middle Men, after one of their number-Matt-saved her from a giant mutant spider. Axa had left the society of the Dome because there, love was forbidden and sex purely for recreation; the puritanical society of the Middlemen though, had banned any form of pleasure at all, and she was forced to flee again in order to avoid being forced to become a ‘Breeder’. Escaping both the Middlemen and their foes, the Mutants (whose plans for her weren’t much different), Axa returned briefly and unwillingly to the City, but was informed that her adventures thus far had
been a test set by the mysterious Director, to see if she was capable of carrying out a vital mission in the world outside. Axa had passed, and was armed with a sword and sent out to meet her destiny.

Axa’s adventures (which are best described as ‘Erotic Sci-Fi’, Axa seldom managing to get through more than three panels without losing some or all of her clothing) were originally recounted in the pages of British newspaper The Sun between 1978 and 1985. The strip was discontinued mid story, halfway through The Betrayed in which Robot Mark turns on Axa, but she later returned in an ‘Axa Color Album’ published by US publishers Ken Pierce Inc, which was far more explicit than the newspaper strip, showing Axa in full frontal nudity several times. In this album, Axa has a number of adventures which seem reminiscent of compressed versions of those in the daily strip, so it is uncertain if they share the same continuity (certainly, Axa has no supporting cast in the album). Similarly, ‘The Island of Noah’ and ‘The Lethal Hive’ (2000AD Showcase #4 & #5, Quality Communications, 1992) also feature a solo Axa (and, in the latter case, read like a retelling of the story in the Sea Dome from the daily strip) but she is
accompanied by Matt and Robot Mark in the somewhat toned down and sanitized two issue ‘Axa’ series published by US publishers Eclipse Comics in 1987 (still penciled by Romero but written by Chuck Dixon). These later adventures may or may not be a part of Axa’s official history.

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Los Angeles Times

 

The Los Angeles Times is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California since 1881. It has the fourth-largest circulation among United States newspapers. From 2000 to 2018, the Times was owned by Tronc (previously Tribune Publishing). It was bought in February 2018 by Patrick Soon-Shiong’s investment firm Nant Capital LLC for $500 million plus $90m in pension liabilities.

Sunday Strips 1937

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Sunday Strips 1938

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Sunday Strips 1939

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Sunday Strips 1943

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Giles

 

Ronald “Carl” Giles OBE (29 September 1916 – 27 August 1995), often referred to simply as Giles, was a cartoonist best known for his work for the British newspaper the Daily Express.

His cartoon style was a single topical highly detailed panel, usually with a great deal more going on than the single joke. Certain recurring characters achieved a great deal of popularity, particularly the extended Giles family, which first appeared in a published cartoon on 5 August 1945 and featured prominently in the strip. Of these, the most remembered is the enigmatic matriarch of the family, known simply as Grandma.

Another recurring favourite was Chalkie, the tyrannical school teacher whom Giles claimed was modelled on one of his childhood teachers, and Larry, the mop-haired child from next door, often seen with a camera.

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UPDATE 16-03-2018

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8,9,10

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11,12,13

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14,15,16

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57,58

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47,48,49,53

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Timid Soul

timidsoul

 

A shaky hanger-on in American English’s crowd of eponyms (words derived from the surnames of real or fictional men and women) is milquetoast, a noun and adjective meaning “timid,” “weak,” or “unassertive.” The word is a play on milk toast, a breakfast dish that has been consumed since the Middle Ages or even earlier.* The player in this case was the New York Tribune cartoonist H. T. Webster, who in the 1920s built his cartoon strip The Timid Soul around a character he named Caspar Milquetoast – in Webster’s words, “the man who speaks softly and gets hit with a big stick.” Before long, milquetoast had entered our vocabulary to describe anyone or anything seemingly weak and ineffectual.

Not surprisingly, it didn’t take long for milquetoast to be misspelled as milktoast. (In 1959, syndicated advice-columnist Ann Landers began a response to a reader who complained that her husband was under the thumb of his domineering mother with, “Why don’t you put the blame where it belongs – right on Caspar Milktoast’s shoulders?”) Though the word is used less frequently today, the milktoast spelling has become increasingly common. Don’t know about you, but when it comes to the resolution of this burning issue I’m not averse to taking the same weak-kneed stance Caspar himself would doubtlessly choose: Let it be… Qué sera, sera… What, me worry?

Timid Soul 1937 Sundays

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Star Weekly

starweekly

The Star Weekly was a Canadian periodical published from 1910 until 1973. The publication was read widely in rural Canada where delivery of daily newspapers was infrequent.

Founded as the Toronto Star Weekly by Joseph E. Atkinson as a Canadian equivalent of British Sunday editions, it began as a 16-page publication. According to one retrospective, “Its weekly menu included feature articles about important issues of the day; offbeat, funny stories; sports features with big, bold photos that made the heroes of hockey, baseball and boxing jump right off the page and, each week, a condensed novel published in serial form, often by one of the most popular authors of the day.” A key feature of the magazine was its extensive section of colour comics which was inaugurated in 1913 and became a major driver of the publication’s circulation success.

In 1924, the Star Weekly absorbed the rival Sunday World to become the only weekend magazine in Toronto. In 1938, as a reflection of its national ambitions, the name became The Star Weekly. The publication included feature articles, fiction, recipes, sports, lifestyle articles, 20 pages of colour comics among other elements. At its peak, in the early 1960s, the magazine averaged 108 pages and sold over one million copies a week and also sold 30,000 copies in the United States.

In 1965, the Star Weekly went from being published by the Toronto Star alone to being published by Southstar Publishers, a consortium of the Toronto Star and Southam Press that also launched The Canadian as a weekend supplement and competitor to Weekend. Jointly, they produced The Canadian/Star Weekly as a newsstand edition for communities that did not receive a newspaper with The Canadian as a supplement while the Star Weekly served as a supplement in the Saturday edition of the Toronto Star.

In 1968, the Star Weekly was purchased outright by Southam and merged with its weekend supplement, The Canadian Magazine and continued to be published as The Canadian/Star Weekly, which was provided for free as a weekend supplement in the Saturday Star and also sold as a standalone on newspaper stands across the country for 20 cents. On December 26, 1973 the Star Weekly ceased publication entirely and The Canadian became the Toronto Star’s weekend supplement.

Until 1968, the Weekly shared many of the staff from the daily Toronto Daily Star. Notable contributors to the Star Weekly included Robert W. Service, Morley Callaghan, Ernest Hemingway, Arthur Lismer, Fred Varley, C.W. Jefferys, Sylvia Fraser, Nellie McClung, Robert Thomas Allen and Jimmy Frise, whose cartoon Bridseye Centre appeared in the magazine for several decades. The last editor of the original Star Weekly until its 1968 sale and merger was Peter Gzowski who later gained fame as a broadcaster. Pierre Berton was a frequent contributor and served as associate editor from 1958 to 1962.

Star Weekly Comics Section 1940-09-14

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Zimmie

zimmie

 

No information on this title.

24 pages/strips Zimmie Various

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