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Welcome on this blog full of information about Newspaper Comic Strips, and offcourse the comics.

The first newspaper comic strips appeared in North America in the late 19th century. The Yellow Kid is usually credited as the first. However, the art form combining words and pictures developed gradually and there are many examples of proto-comic strips.

The Swiss teacher, author and caricature artist Rodolphe Töpffer (Geneva, 1799–1846) is considered the father of the modern comic strips. His illustrated stories such as Histoire de M. Vieux Bois (1827), first published in the USA in 1842 as The Adventures of Obadiah Oldbuck or Histoire de Monsieur Jabot (1831), inspired subsequent generations of German and American comic artists. In 1865, the German painter, author and caricaturist Wilhelm Busch created the strip Max and Moritz, about two trouble-making boys, which had a direct influence on the American comic strip. Max and Moritz was a series of severely moralistic tales in the vein of German children’s stories such as Struwwelpeter (“Shockheaded Peter”); in one, the boys, after perpetrating some mischief, are tossed into a sack of grain, run through a mill and consumed by a flock of geese. Max and Moritz provided an inspiration for German immigrant Rudolph Dirks, who created the Katzenjammer Kids in 1897. Familiar comic-strip iconography such as stars for pain, sawing logs for snoring, speech balloons, and thought balloons originated in Dirks’ strip.

Hugely popular, Katzenjammer Kids occasioned one of the first comic-strip copyright ownership suits in the history of the medium. When Dirks left William Randolph Hearst for the promise of a better salary under Joseph Pulitzer, it was an unusual move, since cartoonists regularly deserted Pulitzer for Hearst. In a highly unusual court decision, Hearst retained the rights to the name “Katzenjammer Kids”, while creator Dirks retained the rights to the characters. Hearst promptly hired Harold Knerr to draw his own version of the strip. Dirks renamed his version Hans and Fritz (later, The Captain and the Kids). Thus, two versions distributed by rival syndicates graced the comics pages for decades. Dirks’ version, eventually distributed by United Feature Syndicate, ran until 1979.

In America, the great popularity of comics sprang from the newspaper war (1887 onwards) between Pulitzer and Hearst. The Little Bears (1893–96) was the first American comic with recurring characters, while the first color comic supplement was published by the Chicago Inter-Ocean sometime in the latter half of 1892, followed by the New York Journal’s first color Sunday comic pages in 1897. On January 31, 1912, Hearst introduced the nation’s first full daily comic page in his New York Evening Journal. The history of this newspaper rivalry and the rapid appearance of comic strips in most major American newspapers is discussed by Ian Gordon. Numerous events in newspaper comic strips have reverberated throughout society at large, though few of these events occurred in recent years, owing mainly to the declining role of the newspaper comic strip as an entertainment form.

I only place newspaperstrips from before 2000, with the occasional exception.

You can access the information and comics through the sidebar.

The comics are mostly in packages from around 100mb, inside these rar-packages you will find the comics in cbr format.

You can view the comics with any cbr-reader like CDisplay or ComicRack.

I did not scan the comics myself only collect them from various sites on the internet, internet archive, Usenet Newsgroups and torrents.
So thanks to all the scanners and uploaders.
This blog is purely ment to preserve the comics and to enjoy them, no financial meanings are involved, if you like the comics buy them as long as they are availabe, because nothing can beat the feeling of reading a real comic.

If you find something wrong (downloads, numbering, information) please let me know so that i can correct the error.

 

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Thanks to the following sites for information :

Barnacle Press

Wikipedia

 

682 responses »

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  1. jeff nelson says:

    Last week I posted early, formative comic strips by Gene Ahern. Today I move forward, with the convoluted story of Ahern’s next classic creation:

    NUT BROTHERS 1921-1936

    At the completion of the run of ‘Otto Auto’ in 1921 Ahern took a major step forward with his next strip ‘The Crazy Quilt’ – a complicated work with four separate strips literally woven together with a design to make it look like a quilt. One of these strips is the first appearance of the Nut Brothers, Ches and Wal. spouting off corny jokes and one-liners at each other in a madcap, screwball fashion… The whole concept of The Crazy Quilt is so bizarre and over-the-top, a truly brilliant and unique creation… [We must also take care to distinguish Ahern’s effort from the ealier jam comic ‘Crazy Quilt’ from 1904 – itself a brilliant work but unrelated to Ahern….]

    This work was perhaps too complicated for Ahern to continue for more than a few months; while he also had something much more important brewing. Later in 1921 he was to launch himself to stratospheric success with his enduring classic ‘Our Boarding House’, featuring the majestic creation of Major Hoople. But Ahern’s creativity was at this time showing no bounds, as at the same time he also started a secondary daily double-panel strip, with the Nut Bros going solo. And this another tremendous work – Ches and Wal continue to fire off jokes at each other across the two panels, but wearing bizarre costumes and performing the most outlandish actions… There is a wonderful luminosity to these panels, with an inexplicable non-linear connectiveness going on… Ahern was flitring at the edges of out-and-out proto-surrealism here…

    As Major Hoople became more and more successful, Ahern gave Our Boarding House more of his attention; the literature says that well before the end of its run, he had turned over the Nut Brothers to a ghost artist.

    But Ches and Wal would not recede quietly into comic strip history. When a Sunday Our Boarding House strip was launched in 1932, Ahern reintroduced the Nut Brothers as a topper strip. And the stupendous, luminous semi-surrealsm began yet again – these are still more tremendous works, a true highlight of the 1930s Sunday comic sections.

    Then, in 1936, Ahern was lured away by Hearst to abandon Our Boarding House and the Nut Brothers but Ches and Wal, now denuded of their names for contractual reasons, jumped over to The Squirrel Cage – among the most titanic creations in the entire history of comics. I have, of course, already provided a hefty run of this classic, and it can be found elsewhere on this blog.

    But even after Ahern’s departure, Ches and Wal were still not going anywhere… Their story concludes in the post I am planning for next week.

    Anyhow, without further ado, here is my attempt to codify this complex history:

    https://www.mediafire.com/folder/641jyxfr5t8ep/Nut+Brothers+1921-1936

    Liked by 1 person

    • boutje777 says:

      Thank you very much, i will make a new page for these later today.

      P.S.

      I think it would be better to wait with updating these for next week or whenever you are ready with the Nut Brothers, so i can make a new page with all the ones and delete the old page from the Nut Brothers.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Tix says:

    Hey guys,

    it’s been a while, and I see many GREAT additions and almost full sets ! thanks for that !

    I can’t wait for Bud Sagendorf’s complete Popeye run to emerge from a dark basement,
    it’s been long overdue 😀

    Thanks for the hard work.

    Like

  3. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 28-09-2021

    Johnny Hazard 5 Sundays S031-S035

    Thanks to:

    Ar
    ComixFiend
    Ranjan Gangopadhyay
    Udai Singh

    Liked by 2 people

  4. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 29-09-2021

    Johnny Hazard 7 Sundays S036-S042

    Thanks to:

    Ar
    ComixFiend
    Ranjan Gangopadhyay
    Udai Singh

    Liked by 1 person

  5. RAMESH BAGWANI says:

    Paico classics
    https://www.mediafire.com/file/bydemp87dyg6p8p/SEA_WOLF.rar/file
    Sea wolf by Jack london

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Dr.Ramesh Bagwani says:

    Paico classics
    Great expectations by Charles
    https://www.mediafire.com/file/ubt3l4dj66rsrhv/great_expectations.rar/file

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Dr.Ramesh Bagwani says:

    Paico classics
    Taming of the shrew
    By William Shakespeare
    https://www.mediafire.com/file/3f0fkrzccbbk7f8/taming_of_the_shrew.rar/file

    Liked by 1 person

  8. jeff nelson says:

    Good day. For the last several weeks I have been uploading sets of links to early work by Gene Ahern, featuring his Nut Bros in their several incarnations on the newspaper comics pages. In 1935 Ahern was lured away by Hearst, and thus abandoned Ches and Wal to go on to create his immortal “Squirrel Cage.”

    But the Nut Bros were popular enough to be continued as what we nowadays would call a ‘legacy strip,’ by the hand of several other cartoonists, most of them uncredited – the only one who was able to put his signature on the strip was Bill Freyse, in the last few years of the strip. The Nut Bros had enough of a following that, even after the era of Sunday topper strips came to an end, it was spun off to become an independently running strip. And it was to last all the way up to 1965 – outliving its original creator Ahern by a good five years.

    And it’s not a bad strip, by no means – not the madcap work of genius that Ahern produced, but still a decent, enjoyable effort which is well worth saving from the ravages of time…

    https://www.mediafire.com/folder/zhp0uqg8gmsqe/Nut+Bros+post+Ahern+1936-1965

    Liked by 1 person

    • boutje777 says:

      Thank you very much, i will download these today en will make a new page for the Nut Brothers with these and those from last week this weekend.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 02-10-2021

    Crazy Quilt 1921 (thanks to Jeff Nelson).
    New title, you can find it in the widget More Strips.
    Nut Brothers 1921/22,1932-1965 (thanks to Jeff Nelson).
    You can find it at the picture links.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 04-10-2021

    Secret Agent X-9 206 – Anina Kreemar – Upgrade
    Thanks to Ar

    Liked by 1 person

  11. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 08-10-2021

    Johnny Hazard 5 Sundays S043-S047

    Thanks to:

    Ar
    ComixFiend
    Ranjan Gangopadhyay
    Udai Singh

    Liked by 1 person

  12. jeff nelson says:

    Good day. This week I am presenting another great but unjustly forgotten classic in the screwball comic genre:

    SALESMAN SAM dailies 1921-1936

    Originated by George Swanson (1897-1981), Salesman Sam (more properly, $alesman $am) was one of the first strips to feature that wild action and those overly exaggerated reaction shots which make screwball strips so timelesly wonderful. Swanson (who typically signed his work as simply ‘Swan’) also is one originators of background signs and jokes decorating the strip. In this way, he is a direct precursor to the wonder that was Smokey Stover; and can also be seen as a more distant ancestor to Kurtzmann and Elder’s eyeball kicks.

    Like so many other comic artists of that period, Swanson was lured away by Hearst with the offer of more money in 1927, and left Salesman Sam behind. Sam was placed, however, in the capable hands of C.D. Small, who was able to perform a nealry perfect imitation of Swanson in both artistic style and screwball content. The strip finally came to an end in 1936. [Some early sources state that the strip ended when Small (b. 1882) suddenly died; but other, more recent and presumably more accurate, sources say that small lived until 1953.]

    There was also a Sunday Salesman Sam strip, but I have been singularly unsuccessful in locating it in the online archives.

    Check it out – you won’t regret it!

    https://www.mediafire.com/folder/dq27mpb59nse2/Salesman+Sam+dailies+1921-1936

    Like

  13. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 10-10-2021

    Salesman Sam 1921-1936
    Thanks to Jeff Nelson
    You can find it at the picturelinks

    Like

  14. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 15-10-2021

    Johnny Hazard 5 Sundays S048-S052

    Thanks to:

    Ar
    ComixFiend
    Ranjan Gangopadhyay
    Udai Singh

    Like

  15. jeff nelson says:

    As was discussed last week when I posted ‘Salesman Sam’, in 1927 George Swanson was lured away by Hearst to abandon his earlier strip. Very soon, however, he launched a new effort for Hearst, which is what I am sharing for this week:

    HIGH PRESSURE PETE 1927-1938

    ‘High Pressure Pete’ was, to all effects and purposes, pretty much the same thing as ‘Salesmen Sam’ – the same frantic action, the same delightful screwball proceedings. Over the course of the strip, however, Swanson gradually simplified his artistic style, and the material slowly grew somewhat less frantic – still good, wacky stuff, but to my mind not quite as wonderful. He also began to introduce longer sequences of continuity – including the (for that time) inevitable storyline where Pete gets marooned in Darkest Africa and winds up pursued by highly racist cannibals.

    Eventually, either growing tired of the original premise, or perhaps to reinvigorate the strip, Swanson introduced a new character, ‘Officer 6 and 7/8’ who quickly came to share the strip’s title, and came to dominate the feature in its last several years.

    At any rate, I am pleased to here offer up yet another in the parade of early, nealry forgotten, screwball classics:

    https://www.mediafire.com/folder/3322xclovddgj/1927_High_Pressure_Pete_1927-1938

    Like

  16. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 17-10-2021

    High Pressue Pete 1927-1938
    Thanks to Jeff Nelson

    You can find it at the picturelinks

    Like

  17. boutje777 says:

    UPDATE 19-10-2021

    Drift Marlo 1964 (thanks to Ar)
    Johnny Hazard – S018 Mammoth Marches On – Updated (thanks to Ar)

    Like

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